Workshops

The conference serves as an effective personal and professional development resource for faculty, staff, students, and professionals seeking to broaden and deepen their perspectives around topics such as bias awareness, discrimination policies and practices, identity development, social justice education, and identity-based topics such as race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender and gender identity. Workshop presenters include both UNT and external community members from around the country.

Click each title to view the details of each workshop.

Concurrent Sessions 1 (9:45 - 11:00 a.m.)

Academic Track

  • Creating Accessible Experiences for Students from Freshman to Graduation

    Speaker(s): Tania Heap, Ed.D. (she/they) Panelist(s): Devon West (he/him/his), Paulina Diaz (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Access and Equitable Practices, Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Institutional Change, Changing Institutional Practices, Diversity and Inclusion, Equal Opportunity

    Learn about navigating college life from the perspective of a freshman and graduating student with a visual disability. The presentation will go over Universal Design for Learning (UDL) as a principle and framework that can be incorporated not only in academic courses, but in all aspects of the college student experience, from completing forms to applying for financial scholarships, to navigating residence life and campus transportation. The panel will discuss possible further steps that institutions should consider to make the college experience accessible for all.

  • Inclusive Higher Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    Speaker(s): Brandi Levingston, Ph.D., CRC (she/her/hers), Brenda Barrio, Ph.D. (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Access and Equitable Practices, Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Inclusive Language and Microaggressions, Institutional Change, Social Justice Education, Changing Institutional Practices, Diversity and Inclusion, Academic Affairs

    Since the passing of PL94-142 44 years ago, the inclusion of students with disabilities have been at the forefront of U.S. public education. From a structural and societal framework, the intent of inclusion was to provide equitable educational opportunities for people marginalized for their differences in abilities. However, equity in inclusive practices across public education remains elusive (Molfenter et al, 2018). It appears evident that students with intellectual disabilities need equitable and inclusive post-secondary education (PSE) opportunities, especially at 4-year institutions of higher education.

  • Race and Immigration: A Student’s Journey

    Speaker(s): Amairani Espinoza (she/her/hers), Angelica Holmes (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Access and Equitable Practices, Ally Development and Coalition Building, Bias Awareness, Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Social Justice Education, Anti-Racism, Immigration, Diversity and Inclusion

    Through dynamic, hands-on, and student-centered training, educators and school leaders will be equipped with strategies and best practices to have conversations about race and immigration. This training is aimed to increase the capacity of the topic of race and immigration in the K-12 setting.

  • Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion: What This Means for Campus Internationalization

    Speaker(s): Amanda White Bennett, Ph.D. (she/her/hers), Nicole Conant (she/her/hers), Rekha Gopalakrishnan she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Access and Equitable Practices, Bias Awareness, Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Academic Affairs, Organizational Culture and Development, Diversity and Inclusion

    Diversity, Equity and Inclusion with an International Focus. How can universities better support growing international student populations and promote global perspectives and intercultural competencies within the classroom? By bridging the cultural gap with empathy, understanding and awareness.

  • Balancing Two Worlds: Supporting Transracial Asian/American Adoptees in College

    Speaker(s): Daniel Suda (he/him/his)
    Keywords: Bias Awareness, Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Inclusive Language and Microaggressions, Anti-Racism, Asian, Pacific Islander, and Desi-American, Biracial/Multiracial, Intersectionality and Intersected Identities

    Transracial Asian/American Adoptees are an invisible identity on college campuses. This population, is often considered to be "balancing two worlds" with racial identities influenced from ones heritage, and others from the environmental upbringing. This presentation, provides an overview of recent research related to supporting this population. This research proposes a new, relevant model of racial identity development that is inclusive of the needs and experiences of transracial Asian/American adoptee students. Our racial identity development model seeks to inform college and university administrators, faculty, and practitioners.

  • I'm a Woman And...

    Speaker(s): Alexandria Gurley, M.A. (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Privilege and Systemic Oppression, Intersectionality and Intersected Identities, Privilege, Gender Identity & Gender Expression

    This is a creative writing workshop meant to examine ideals of identity and intersectionality as it relates to the woman’s experience in today’s social climate.

Either Track

  • Building Partnerships for Systemic Change

    Speaker(s): LT Robinson, M.S. (she/her/hers), Brandi Scott, Ph.D. (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Institutional Change, Organizational Culture and Development, Social Justice Education, Anti-Racism, Diversity and Inclusion, Coalition Building

    Higher education equity and inclusion efforts are becoming increasingly complex, but what is the best strategy to approach such challenges? Join us as we explore individual and organizational development models and tools that combine resource sharing, campus partnerships, and strategic planning to address multi-layered campus issues and enact substantive change.

  • Career Center Initiatives to Engage Black and Latinx Students

    Speaker(s): Margaret Oaikena, M.Ed. (she/her/hers), Eric Green, M.S.O.D. (he/him/his)

    In this session, you will learn how the UNT Career Center is specifically serving two of our largest underrepresented student populations, Black and Latinx students. After evaluating our services and gathering student input, we implemented strategies to intentionally engage Black and Latinx students and connect them to professional opportunities. We will also discuss how we leveraged campus and employer partnerships in our outreach to Black and Latinx students.

Corporate Track

  • Demystifying Inclusion: 9 Focus Areas for Measurable Impact

    Speaker(s): Lisa Russell (she/her/hers), Arshiya Malik (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Promising Practices, Recruitment and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion Metrics and ROI, Diversity and Inclusion, Assessment/Evaluation, Organizational Culture and Development

    Inclusion can be tricky because it has to do with how people feel, how they experience and interact with others and their sense of belonging within your organization. Aleria's framework, the Categories of Inclusion, provides a strategic way to approach inclusion, identify specific opportunities for growth within your organization and measure their impact.

  • How to Get Your Organization's DEI Work Unstuck

    Speaker(s): Terrian Barnes (she/her/hers), Demetria Miles-McDonald (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Institutional Change, Organizational Development, Promising Practices, Workplace Climate, Diversity and Inclusion Metrics and ROI, Changing Institutional Practices, Organizational Culture and Development, Assessment/Evaluation

    Consulting for a broad range of organizations, we frequently find they’re pursuing DEI initiatives for all the right reasons--they’re change agents; want to make a difference; believe DEI is a moral responsibility; know DEI impacts the bottom line. The catch? They don’t know how to move the needle. Companies are basically doubling down on the same approaches that got them where they are-- without strategy, specificity, timelines, or measurable goals. This workshop will share tools to help you get unstuck.

Concurrent Sessions 2 (11:15 - 12:30 p.m.)

Academic Track

  • Disability and Inclusion

    Speaker(s): Jessica Stone, M.S., CRC, LPC (she/her/hers), Randalynn Johnson, B.A., BEI Level III (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Access and Equitable Practices, Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Inclusive Language and Microaggressions, Privilege and Systemic Oppression, Self-Care and Mindfulness, Social Justice Education, Diversity and Inclusion, Intersectionality and Intersected Identities, Privilege

    Creating a truly inclusive and equitable environment includes acknowledging the benefits and diversity our students bring to our campuses, as well as challenging unconscious or conscious ableist views. Often not known is how intersectionally diverse our students with disabilities are and how to recognize and embrace all of these identities in our practices. This also includes learning how to make our instructional and programming affairs accessible utilizing Universal Design concepts. Our presentation will particularly highlight serving students who are d/Deaf/Hard of Hearing and Blind/Visually Impaired.

  • A Mile in Their Shoes: Neurodiversity and Cultural-Based Perspectives

    Speaker(s): Kimberly Mosley, M.Ed., J.D.
    Keywords: Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Diversity and Inclusion, African American/Black, Intersectionality and Intersected Identities

    Beauty resides in differences. In any given classroom lies a sea of diversity, complete with apparent and obscure representations. Respect for such diversity is precisely what a society seeking to exist in harmony must prioritize. This session will take participants on a reflective, simulation-filled journey towards deeper relationships with their most vulnerable students. Professionals from all walks of life are provided with a culturally responsive guide to engagement with individuals from diverse backgrounds. Participants will also be equipped to ensure a student emphasis, particularly on those with developmental and mental health concerns.

  • Equity in School Counseling

    Speaker(s): Tishara Jackson, Ed.D., LCDC, CSC (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Access and Equitable Practices, Bias Awareness, Inclusive Language and Microaggressions, Diversity and Inclusion, Organizational Culture and Development, Cultural Humility

    Professional School Counselors in Texas are guided by the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) and the Texas Education Agency (TEA). As such, we are guided by the ASCA Ethical Standards and the Texas Model for Comprehensive School Counseling Programs. Within the heart of each of these documents are mandates for equity within the services we provide. This presentation starts with identifying the harms created by inequities in education and concludes with actionable steps for school counselors and other mental health professionals within a school setting.

  • Beyond the Box: Navigating the Asian American Identity

    Speaker(s): Chelsea Bassett, M.Ed. (she/her/hers), Lilly Ramin, M.L.S. (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Anti-Racism, Asian, Pacific Islander, and Desi-American, Employee Resource Groups, Diversity and Inclusion

    Whether it’s the Census, a form at the DMV, or a survey from your favorite company; the U.S.A. loves a box. Asia is the largest continent on the planet and the term “Asian” refers to over half of the world’s population. These race-based boxes are limited, and complicated in their inclusion and exclusion, yet used heavily. Join us as we can all do better to support those who identify with the Asian identity and work to create opportunities where they do not exist.

  • Supporting First-Generation Students in the Online Environment

    Speaker(s): Marilu Howard, M.S. (she/her/hers), Desiree Padron (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Access and Equitable Practices, Institutional Change, Diversity and Inclusion, Coalition Building, Hispanic-Serving Institutions

    Navigating the world of higher education can be challenging for first-generation college students. The pandemic only made this journey tougher. Join us in discussing ways to support this community in the online classroom and beyond.

  • Race and Reconciliation: Educate, Engage and Empower

    Speaker(s): Leslie Ekpe, M.A., M.B.A. (she/her/hers)
    Panelist(s): Sylviane Greensword, Ph.D. (she/her/hers), Marcellis Perkins, M.Ed. (he/him/his)
    Keywords: Access and Equitable Practices, Institutional Change, Organizational Development, Privilege and Systemic Oppression, Social Justice Education, Anti-Racism, Organizational Culture and Development, Changing Institutional Practices, Anti-Racism

    Considering the multiple attempts to exclude racism, historical enslavement, and racial capitalism in classrooms and on college campuses, the constituents of the university are ill-prepared for the reality of society and what it means to navigate through Whitewashed spaces. Utilizing the Race and Reconciliation Initiative at Texas Christian University as a case study, this workshop will demonstrate how formal academic taskforces can initiate a culture of racial reconciliation at various levels and areas of the university campus.

Either Track

  • Engaging in Dialogues about Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

    Speaker(s): Stephen John Quaye, Ph.D. (he/him/his)
    Keywords: Ally Development and Coalition Building, Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Inclusive Language and Microaggressions, Privilege and Systemic Oppression, Social Justice Education Anti-Racism, Identity-Based and Other Diversity Programming, Promising Practices, Workplace Climate, Diversity and Inclusion, Privilege

    What is the difference between diversity, equity, and inclusion? How do I engage in dialogues about difficult topics in ways that are constructive and do not result in people shutting down? What role does my identity play in these dialogues? In this workshop, participants will learn strategies for engaging in dialogues about diversity, equity, and inclusion.

  • Ensuring Respect, Equity & Inclusion for Fat People

    Speaker(s): Amy Harth, Ph.D. (she/they)
    Keywords: Bias Awareness, Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Inclusive Language and Microaggressions, Privilege and Systemic Oppression, Social Justice Education, Identity-Based and Other Diversity Programming, Workplace Climate, Diversity and Inclusion, Intersectionality and Intersected Identities, Privilege

    As Diversity, Equity & Inclusion efforts recognize the ways in which fat people are excluded from society, many DEI scholars & practitioners want help understanding the issues larger-bodied people face as students and colleagues in higher education. This workshop explains these inequities and how to create meaningful cultures of respect and inclusion for fat people focusing on policies, procedures and other actions academics and other leaders can implement.

Corporate Track

  • How Support Can Improve Outcomes for Employees with Mental Illness

    Speaker(s): Megan Lawton, M.Ed. (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Institutional Change, Organizational Development, Recruitment and Retention, Workplace Climate, Changing Institutional Practices, Diversity and Inclusion, Organizational Culture and Development

    Like many disabilities, mental illness can impact any employee at any time. Despite depression and anxiety disorders costing the global economy $1 trillion each year in lost productivity, companies still struggle to best support employees experiencing a mental illness event. In this session we’ll discuss ways to proactively create a more inclusive and supportive company culture, how to support employees experiencing a mental illness event, and how these supportive measures can increase productivity and retention.

Concurrent Sessions 3 (2:30 - 3:45 p.m.)

Academic Track

  • Addressing Issues Related to Students with Disabilities in DEI Initiatives

    Speaker(s): Sheryl Burgstahler, Ph.D. (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Access and Equitable Practices, Organizational Development, Diversity and Inclusion, Equal Opportunity, Changing Institutional Practices

    Is disability a diversity category addressed in your Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) initiative? If not, do you address the needs of individuals with disabilities in the marginalized groups that are your focus? In this session participants will consider including individuals with disabilities as a marginalized group to address in DEI initiatives and designing DEI activities designed for another marginalized groups to be accessible and inclusive of its members who also have disabilities. A model and resources for guiding such DEI efforts will be shared.

  • Engaging with IT to Accelerate DEI Initiatives on Campus

    Speaker(s): David Palumbo, Ph.D. (he/him/his) Panelist(s): Ivy Banks, M.Ed., J.D. (she/her/hers), Damian Clarke, Ph.D. (he/him/his)
    Keywords: Ally Development and Coalition Building, Bias Awareness, Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), Institutional Change, Anti-Racism, Diversity and Inclusion, Intergroup Dialogue/Facilitation, Changing Institutional Practices

    Advances in DEI are campus wide opportunities. As such, we should provide campus wide views into prioritization, design, implementation, funding, and analysis. A key partnership for success is a close working relationship between DEI leaders and IT organizations on campus. Rather than support a “transactional” relationship between these groups, we recommend an “integrated approach” of close collaboration. We will provide examples of how these relationships have been developed on different campuses and the positive impacts that have resulted from their combined efforts.

  • Nobody’s Perfect: Implicit Bias in College Admissions

    Speaker(s): Landon Ellison (he/him/his)
    Keywords: Access and Equitable Practices, Bias Awareness, Inclusive Language and Microaggressions, Social Justice Education, Recruitment and Retention, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Multicultural Affairs

    Admissions practices is an often-discussed topic concerning higher education. Practices such as standardized testing have historically been a barrier for marginalized students but are also engrained into the fabric of college admissions. This presentation will discuss the history of these often-biased criteria and methods of consideration on how institutions may evolve to be more access oriented without concerns of declining prestige

  • It's Ok to be Black: Programmatic Approaches for Identity Development

    Speaker(s): Khamisie Green, M.Ed. (he/him/his)
    Keywords: Identity (Disability, Ethnicity, Gender Identity & Expression, Race, Sexuality, etc.), African American/Black, Multicultural Affairs, Cultural Humility

    Professionals and students are facing the challenge of engaging Black students who are ready to explore their culture, students that do not yet identify with their culture, and students that are not ready to reconcile with the dominant culture. This conversation on programing and identity development will provide opportunities to learn an innovative programming strategy and strengthen awareness of self and others. This interactive presentation will empower attendees to engage more dynamically with Black students who are in various stages along their cultural development journey.

  • EDI in Organizations: A Libraries’ Perspective

    Speaker(s): Kevin Yanowski, M.S. (he/him/his), Stacey Wolf, Coby Condrey, MLIS
    Keywords: Access and Equitable Practices, Institutional Change, Changing Institutional Practices, Diversity and Inclusion, Recruitment and Retention

    Librarians from the UNT Libraries will share some of the EDI initiatives taking place in the UNT Libraries stemming from a multi-level climate survey, how the libraries as a whole is trying to be abetter ally, and how we can help other departments with their EDI initiatives.

  • Reframing Allyship: The Noun and Verb

    Speaker(s): Christopher Smith, Ed.D. (he/him/his)
    Keywords: Ally Development and Coalition Building, Bias Awareness, Inclusive Language and Microaggressions, Diversity and Inclusion, Leadership Development, Intersectionality and Intersected Identities

    "Reframing Allyship: The Noun and Verb" highlights the distinction between being a performative ally and an action-driven ally. Going beyond well-intended press releases and statements reaffirming commitments to social justice and equality, this presentation introduces effective strategies to implement ally-focused training and programming as well as advantages of incorporating allyship, diversity, and inclusion in every level of your institutional operations.

Either Track

  • DEI Strategies: When the Pandemic Pauses the World

    Speaker(s): Elgrie J Hurd III, M.A., M.S. (he/him/his)
    Keywords: Ally Development and Coalition Building, Institutional Change, Organizational Development, Anti-Racism, Social Responsibility, Workplace Climate, Diversity and Inclusion Metrics and ROI, Diversity and Inclusion, Organizational Culture and Development, Changing Institutional Practices

    COVID-19 pandemic put a lot of things for corporations and higher education on pause. This included, but was not limited to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) efforts. Unfortunately, this was when DEI efforts needed to be increased. This session seeks to offer participants a chance to learn effective strategies (and challenges) to implement new DEI strategies within an organization during a pandemic. There will also be a question-and-answer session for participation to inquire about specific ways the DEI strategies can help their organization.

  • Holding up the Mirror: Exploring White Accountability Groups

    Speaker(s): Rachel Jackson, M.S. (she/her/hers) Panelist(s): Kelly Evans, Ph.D. (she/her/hers), Megan Cunningham, M.Ed. (she/her/hers), Rachel Dalton, Ed.D. (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Ally Development and Coalition Building, Bias Awareness, Institutional Change, Organizational Development, Privilege and Systemic Oppression, Anti-Racism, Employee Resource Groups, Promising Practices, Social Responsibility, Workplace Climate

    During this workshop, participants will learn ways to foster more intentionally inclusive and equitable environments through the forming of white accountability employee resource groups. This session will provide strategies for approaching common challenges; ways to measure progress; and explore future possibilities of white accountability groups.

Corporate Track

  • The ROI of LGBTQ+ Inclusion

    Speaker(s): Elena Joy Thurston (she/her/hers)
    Keywords: Institutional Change, Recruitment and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion Metrics and ROI, Diversity and Inclusion, Gender Identity & Gender Expression, Talent Pipeline Development

    This presentation breaks down the ROI of LGBTQ+ Inclusion, as well as the actions needed to increase authentic culture. The audience will learn common missteps that show clients, co-workers, and customers that they aren't aware of the issues that face the LGBTQ+ community. Finally, we’ll utilize the Impactful Benefits Survey© that answers exactly which employee benefits that LGBTQ+ families value the most. All of this information together gives audience members the edge in allied and inclusive leadership.

 

Making Your Presentation Accessible

As you deliver your presentation to your audience, assume that some of them will be unable to hear or see you and your content. If offering interactive hands-on activities, be mindful that some people may be unable to raise their hand or move a mouse. Some people may be unable to talk. Some people may not understand you depending on how you convey the information. Below are a few quick tips to help you in making your talk and your presentation materials accessible to everyone.

  1. If selected, we require that if you use slides for your presentation, that they be created in Microsoft PowerPoint.
  2. Caption everything – videos within PowerPoints need to be captioned before they are added to the presentation because captioning them after the fact is very difficult.
  3. If there are interpreters or CART providers as communication access, the providers need to have the presentation early.
  4. In your presentation slides, use one standard sans-serif font such as Verdana, Helvetica, or Arial. Use one font only if possible. Ensure font size is adequate for different viewing experiences (e.g., from a distance, on a mobile device).
  5. If you are using images and other visual content that is informational, be sure to describe them adequately.
  6. If using complex images such as maps or charts, keep high color contrast between text and background and do not rely on color alone to label trends and variables – use, for example, different patterns or full vs. dotted lines.
  7. Say all of the information that is presented on the slide.
  8. Use plain English when talking, keeping it jargon-free and idiom-free. If using an acronym, state its meaning in full.
  9. Share your presentation materials with your audience in advance. Be sure to follow best practices for making your materials accessible.

If you wish to learn more about how to make your presentation materials and your live talk accessible to everyone, check out How to Make Your Presentations Accessible to All.

Questions? Contact Diversity.Inclusion@unt.edu